Then & Now: A look at 3 years of progress

My Christmas gift this year was a brand new computer, and in getting organized and moving files around to transfer from my old laptop to the new one, I stumbled across images from the very first time we met Storm. We visited him at the barn where he was being consigned and were pleased with what we saw. Looking back, there were some key things that we didn’t pick up on that would have helped us be better prepared for who Storm really was, but in the end the decision was a good one.

Finding the photos proved to be invaluable in a look at just how far we have come over the course of 3 years that Storm and I have been together. The changes that have happened in Storm’s body are amazing. Without further ado, Storm from 2008 to 2011.


Storm front 2008

Storm - front, April 2008

Storm front 2011

Storm - front March 2011

Yellow Arrow: Note that his stance is much closer to square in the current photo. His both of his hind feet are clearly visible in the 2008 photo, where as they are set much further apart in the 2001 photo.
Blue Arrow: Being under weight is noticeable from the front view. Additionally, notice that his ribs are pushed out to his right (the side that the arrow is on), but in the photo from 2011 his posture is much straighter, with an equal amount of rib on either side of his body.


Storm back 2008

Storm - back, April 2008

Storm back 2011

Storm - back, March 2011

Blue Arrow: Storm’s stance is uneven, his head is off to the right, reflected in the position of his feet. His hips are very uneven across the top.
Yellow Arrow: In the 2008 image his ribs are not even visible, and his hindquarters are much less muscled than in the 2011 image.
Purple Arrow: Storm’s stance has improved, standing much closer to square with a much wider set to his feet.


Storm left 2008

Storm - left, April 2008

Green Arrow: The difference in the muscling is obvious across his topline, including the dip in front of his withers from being tight through the trapizius muscle.
Red Arrow: The hollow behind the withers from saddle damage has smoothed out in the 2011 image, and his back is visibly less dropped.
Blue Arrow: The overall shape of his entire rump is much rounder and less angular having developed muscles for Storm to push forward rather than pull with his neck.

Storm left 2011

Storm, left - March 2011

Yellow Arrow: Reduction in the muscling on the bottom side of the neck from using his topline/hindquarters to move forward rather than “pulling” with his front legs and lower neck muscles.
Purple Arrow: Despite his stance, there is visibly more weight on the forehand in the 2008 image versus the 2011 image. Storm’s front leg is more straight under him, rather than back at an angle, in the 2011 image, indicating that his weight is not as heavily anchored on his front legs even when standing still.

Similar things to note from the right side. It is also noticeable in this set of images that Storm’s head does not appear as large in the 2011 image. This is due to the fact that his neck is more appropriately developed, along with the rest of his body. His head is no longer as out of proportion with the rest of his body.

Storm right 2008

Storm - right, April 2008

Storm right 2011

Storm - right, March 2011


When I look back at these photos the changes are stunning. Storm has developed into a beautiful well balanced horse. He looks good, really good, and even inexperienced horse people (and non-horse people alike) comment on how he looks in positive terms. I realized as I put these images together that the exclamation of “Look at the size of his head!” is rarely uttered anymore. He looks in proportion and is pleasing to the eye. I shutter to think what might have happened if we were not brought together.  And I relish in the future changes that will continue to take place.

Category: Horse Ownership 101, Student Log · Tags:

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Equine Imbalance

...."Many problems (of the horse) can be caused by unbalanced patterns of tension in the body"........
....."Uneven tension will often result in uneven body use, difficulty carrying a saddle and rider, stiffness generally 'through the back' or the body as a whole, behavioural problems etc..... " Gavin Scofield D.O.
Founder of Equine Postural Training &
Official Osteopath for the British Endurance team

Acknowledgements

Photos Contributed by:
Jim McCleary - McCleary Photography
Christianne Gentile - True by Christianne
Sarah Wengernuk - Essence Photography

Quote Of The Day

Imagination is more important than knowledge
~Albert Einstein